Category Archives: EMT

The Spice Must Flow

I’m currently reading through the Dune series of books by Frank Herbert (and later continued by his son). There is a substance in that universe called “melange” or “spice”. It has the effect of prolonging life, and imparting prescience to certain users. It permeates every planet in the universe as everyone is hooked on it to some degree or another. It’s largely benign as far as side effects go, and it is basically the central hub around which the entire universal economy turns.

We also have Spice here on Earth. Unfortunately, it’s not beneficial, it doesn’t prolong life and it is far far from benign.

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Surviving the EMT certification

emtFor many departments around the country, Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) certification is a must  (and often a pre-requisite for application). This is understandable, as most fire departments handle a heavy load of medical calls also. EMTs provide critical patient care in often dangerous environments. Be they (ambulance, fire, or law enforcement EMTs) are making a difference.

Many different schools, departments, colleges, and vocational schools offer EMT classes. The logical place to start looking for one is your local community college.

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Teacher, Paramedic Mike Kacsur

1476076_742780989137254_3748784364079001896_nOver the last few months, I’ve mentioned Mike Kacsur a few times. Mike is the instructor for my EMT course. At the same time, he’s a full-time paramedic with Southwest Ambulance. He teaches EMT courses, Paramedic courses, driving courses, and a few others I believe. I’m a little fuzzy on the details of everything he is teaching because he’s not a bragging sort of fellow. He dedicates his life to helping others, whether it’s in the back of an ambulance or in front of a class.

On Sunday, December 14, Mike had a medical emergency necessitating brain surgery the following day. He is going to require an extended time off from both of his jobs. Being the sole provider for his family, they are facing some rough times ahead. His friends have set up a page to help show support for Mike and his wife April by raising money to support medical costs.

Please consider helping him and his family out. You can help with donations via the gofundme page, or share the link on facebook/twitter etc, or share a link to this post. Also, please keep him and his family in your prayers.

Please share this link.

 

In case you missed it… here’s the link…

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Soon….

You may have noticed my lack of long posts lately.

It’s not that I’ve got no ideas for content or things that I want to document. It’s currently crunch-time for my semester of EMT training 🙂 I’m using any and all spare time for studying for my finals, practicals, and NREMT exam.

Coming soon…

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#StraightFromMyNotebook – The Box Heart

This is a visual by Mike Kacsur my EMT instructor. It’s called “The Box Heart”. The TAs giggled about it, but I thought it was a great visual aid that was easy to conceptualize and easy to memorize (as evidenced by my score on the test) 🙂 Yes it’s simplistic, but effective.

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Here is my original scrawled note…

You can enlarge it if you like, but it won’t be any easier to read!

 

Here is one that I made in dia.

BoxHeartClick to enlarge! If you like it, please be sure to drop Mike a line and let him know!

 

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#StraightFromMyNotebook – Signs of Death

Presumptive signs of death

  • Unresponsive to pain
  • No pulse (carotid)
  • No breathing
  • No deep tendon or corneal reflexes
  • No eye movement
  • No systole
  • Profound cyanosis
  • Low core temperature

Definitive Signs of Death

  • Obvious Mortal damage (ie decapitation)
  • Dependent lividity (blood settling)
  • Rigor mortis (stiffening of muscles, 2-12 hours after death)
  • Putrefaction (decomposition of body tissues (40-96 hours after death))

*Note*  #StraightFromMyNotebook posts are condensed from my actual notebooks and class materials. Text Used is : Emergency Care And Transportation Of The Sick And Injured: A Comprehensive Guide

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